Tag Archives | success

Yoda Quote #2, “There Is No Try…”

This is a continuation of the Trading Words of Wisdom By Yoda, for Quote #3 click here.

“Do or do not, there is no try” -The Empire Strikes Back

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When Yoda hears Luke’s uncertain remark about trying to get his ship out of the swamp, he is quick to reprimand Luke with what has almost become a trademark phrase for him: “Do or do not, there is no try.” He knows that if Luke “tries” then he will fail because he has already doubted his abilities.

Try” has a slightly negative connotation that goes with it. Have you ever asked someone to do something and gotten the half-hearted, “okay…I’ll try.” As if that leaves you with inspired confidence in their desire to succeed. The secret is in the mindset; if you’re convinced in your ability to accomplish something, then you do it. If a small part of yourself doesn’t think you have it in you or you don’t want to, then you try it and who knows whether you’ll succeed or not, but I’d rather not leave success up to chance.

We’ve heard that saying, especially in sports, that 80% of success if mental. What does this mean? This means that while the fundamentals and technique are important, the way you think about them is even more important. Your drive, mindset, and how you handle successes and setbacks contribute to that 80% of success. Michael Jordan, who may not be identified as a trader (though his successful investment in the Charlotte Hornets boosted him up to billionaire status), has said that “some people want it to happen, some wish it would happen, others make it happen.” There’s the difference between trying and doing. Now, I would like to point out sometimes failure is a step towards success; Michael Jordan didn’t make all of his shots, Luke didn’t defeat Darth Vader the first time he faced him, and Yoda was 900 years old before we truly appreciated him for the Jedi Master he was. However, if you make up your mind to do instead of try you’ll find more fulfillment in failing and joy in your inevitable success.

Happy Trading, and May The Force Be With You!

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Apiary Fund – Breaking the Trading Psychology Barriers

There are three obstacles Apiary Fund traders must overcome in order to get funded: trading knowledge, trading skill, and trading psychology. The toughest of these is trading psychology.

The next few Apiary Fund blog posts will focus on a different barrier we have in our trading psychology and present ways to break the barrier!

Trading Psychology Barrier:  Getting Something for Nothing

Most people like the idea of trading currencies because of the vast fortunes you can make with very little effort. Sadly, it’s not that easy. Trading currencies requires work – a lot it.  You must spend time learning and developing your skill. Like anything that requires skill, such as sports, music, or professional occupation, you should not expect to just walk in and experience instant success. The desire to make something from nothing leads to speculative behavior.  Speculative behavior leads to financial ruin.

Breaking the Trading Psychology Barrier:  Commitment.

Breaking the trading psychology barrier of getting something for nothing is as simple as making a commitment.

The usual excuse for the uncommitted is that:

–       “There’s something ‘better’ around the corner” – or –

–       “There’s no clear evidence of a win with what I’m doing.”

Modern psychology will tell you that ‘WHAT’ you commit to is secondary to ‘HOW’ you commit to it.  It is ‘how’ you commit to trading that will make you successful. Only the smallest part of committing is a passive process that evaluates whether or not something will work.  The #1 factor that will make the choice to trade currencies successful or not is what work you put into it.

Stay tuned for tips on the next trading psychology barrier:  Fight or Flight.

Happy Trading!

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Our Philosophy On Success

I was on facebook the other night, and I ran into an article, “Will Your Child be Rich or Poor? 15 Poverty Habits Parents Teach Their Children.”  I read the article, and was surprised by Habit #4. It stated,

“62% of the wealthy floss their teeth every day vs. 16% of the poor.”
 

Now that may seem like a silly statistic about an unrelated field.  I mean, how does flossing your teeth connect with the size of your bank account?  As I started to think, it hit me as to why it was #4 on the list. Successful people are creatures of habit, but not just any habits: Successful habits.

If you want clean teeth you need to both brush and floss.  I don’t think I am saying anything too ground breaking here.  I mean, we’ve all been taught the benefits of dental hygiene from a very young age.

So how will dental floss help you in your trading?

Habits.  We, by our life experience, create habits on how we act when different things happen to us.  When people see the market falling they are naturally fearful.  When people see the market raising they are naturally greedy.  It is not the emotions that define who we are, it is what we DO with those emotions.  Do you let fear take control of you?  Do you cut your winners short?  What we have found in the Apiary Fund is that the most successful traders are the ones who have a set of rules, and apply those rules consistently every day.  We all have times in trading where the market does not go our way.  The question is what do we do at those times?

Remedy: Know your rules and follow them.

That might seem like a nice trite remark, but what do I mean by know your rules?  Step one is to write your rules down on paper.  I know most of you have your system that you follow in your head, but if you can’t write it down then you can’t measure it.  If you can’t measure it you can’t improve it.  Once you know it, you have to follow it.

Seems like a simple enough recipe for success, but then again so does flossing!

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Fear of Failure

A 2014 study conducted by Babson College revealed how fear of failure stops some people from engaging in activities where failure is a possible outcome – including the activity of learning. The study concluded that the fear of failure negatively influences a person’s motivation to learn and their attitude toward learning.A mature business man giving a presentation to some colleagues.

This study has direct implications on the mission and purpose of the Apiary Fund. At its core, the Apiary Fund teaches a person how to manage an investment portfolio – an activity where risk of failure is very real. We accomplish the goal through a progression of classes, simulation, and the eventual management of a small portfolio in live market conditions.

At every step, Apiary works to mitigate the elements of risk and teach a person how to properly analyze and make decisions that include risk. We strive in every possible way to give a person the greatest chance of success in learning how to manage an investment portfolio.

The irony of this study is that when fear of failure prevents a person from engaging in an activity that will make them better, it almost assures their failure in that activity. And when that activity is learning how to manage our finances and investments, the cost of failure can be high! Imagine living your life and avoiding all investment decisions – it is likely to leave you broke for retirement. Imagine giving all those decisions to someone else – it leaves you vulnerable to fraud, mismanagement, and high costs.

We know that many of you join Apiary Fund for the opportunity of trading our money. It is a wonderful incentive – one I wish I had when I was first starting! However, what you really gain through your Apiary experience is a skill and an ability to make intelligent decisions that involve the risk. That is a skill and an ability that has far a greater reach and value in your life than any amount of money you could trade for Apiary Fund!

Happy Trading,
Shawn

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Success on the Field

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Everyone knows that Apiary fund is made of traders, but did you know that we have a professional football player right here in our midst? That’s right. Drafted by the BC Lions in Vancouver, Paul Allen grew up playing ball and decided to play for BYU in 1959.

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In 1961 Paul was a running back and special teams BYU Football player. He holds the record for the longest average punt return yardage. He was a tank whose tenacity and perseverance allowed him to carry the ball an average of 40.1 yards each punt return.

When asked about his success, he said it mainly came because he ran fast-and because he was really scared. Well, we say tongue-in-cheek that it takes a lot more than fear to hold a record like that. He still holds the record, and it has stood for over 50 years. For more information about what the Legacy reward is, click here:http://thejetaward.com/the-jet-award-story/ You can see Paul’s stats at http://byucougars.com/athlete/m-football/paul-allen

 

Paul has brought that same record making tenacity and perseverance that brought him success on the field into his work. He loves helping and developing traders. His patience in seeing the lay of the land both on and off the field has been a great asset to Apiary. Paul has been instrumental in counseling traders, helping them get into funded accounts, and becoming successful in the stock market.

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