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How Running Has Helped Me Become a Better Trader

Ever been stuck in the slumps? Yeah, me too.

tired-runner

For the past couple of months I’ve felt like the man in this picture. When I ran, I was just going through the motions-just trying to finish my work out. Sure, there were some good days here and there, but I knew that I wasn’t reaching my potential as a runner. I also wasn’t feeling the happiness and energy I usually felt after a good run. I approached my coach, and he gave me some steps to help me out of this rut I’d gotten myself into. However, I realized that these steps wouldn’t just help me in my running; they could help me with my profession, my social life, and (of course) my trading.

  1. Set my sights higher than just the next race

I know you’ve all probably heard more than your fair share of motivational speeches centered on goal setting, but honestly there is something about a goal that just helps you focus on improvement. When I stopped and focused on what I was going to accomplish the racing season, I saw each race as a step to reaching my personal record. When trading, you have to look further down the road than your next trade.   What do you want to accomplish today?  This week?  This month? You have to set your sights higher than a single trade and discover what you can do to accomplish your personal best.

  1. Stop running so much

What? To improve running you need to stop running? To a degree, yes. Running daily is very important, but I always reserve one day of the week to resting and recovery. Without this break, I would end up running less during the week because my legs would become overworked. Sometimes, you need a little break from trading. Don’t spend all day with your eyes glued to the candles on your screen-go for a run or something 😉

  1. Track your mileage

I always track my mileage – along with how much sleep I get, and the food I eat. This not only helps me feel good throughout the season, but I can look back and see when I was struggling or doing good. By tracking my progress this way I can see what made me sick or tired and what made me feel good and energized. Track your trades. Notice what setups work for you, and what triggers an unwanted emotional response. Besides, whether your profitable or not, it always feels good to look back and see the progress you’re making.

  1. Mix it up

Contrary to what some may imagine of a typical cross country runner, I actually lift a lot weights. My core and upper body strength is just as important as having strong legs when I run. Sometimes, at the end of a race, if your legs feel like they don’t have the energy you can pump your arms, and ,crazily enough, your legs will follow! When you’re trading you need to be prepared for different market events. Learn to trade in long summer doldrums, as well as high votility markets.

  1. Change your attitude

One of my pet peeves is when I go to a race, and hear runners complain that they have to run. Don’t you run because you like it? If you don’t like it, then why are you here running?! I like feeling strong, the runner’s high, and swelling accomplishment that fills you up and makes you feel like floating. What do you like about trading? If you can’t answer this question, then you need to find out why you’re trading. Identifying why you’re trading will help get you through the slumps.

I hope if you’re feeling a little bit stuck in a rut in your trading, that you can try these out. Make trading enjoyable again, and go make some pips.

Happy Trading!

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Demo Accounts Hold You Responsible

“Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration.” -Thomas Edison

Hello Traders,

Take a look at this equity curve from one of Apiary’s demo accounts:

Screen Shot 2015-09-23 at 9.52.03 AM

What do you see?

I see someone with a mental block. However, I also see that they kept trying. Go back and take a look at that quote I’m sure most of you just skimmed over. Perspiration (i.e. hard work) is the key to becoming “genius.” This definitely applies to trading. Apiary Fund’s demo accounts offer a chance to become a genius at trading.  It gives you real life trading scenarios and demands without any of the pressure of trading real money. This teaches you to think and develop strategy instead of relying on luck. Luck will run out eventually, and it will be necessary to develop a strategy.

If you haven’t guessed by now, this is one of my demo accounts. Personally, I like to use a consolidation breakout strategy, and when I use it right it produces a nice equity curve. Using this, or any strategy, requires discipline and hard work. A friend gave me 7 steps to consider before placing any trade.

  1. Proper preparation
  2. Hard Work
  3. Patience
  4. A detailed plan before every trade
  5. Discipline
  6. Communication
  7. Replaying important trades

While each of these steps may mean something different to each of you, everyone could benefit by considering them before entering a trade.  With each of my big losing trades, I missed applying at least one of these seven steps.  My rebounding wins happened because I chose to follow these steps. I’ve learned that I can’t control what happens with a trade after I’ve placed it, but I can control what I do before placing it. My 6 biggest losing trades in this account are responsible for over half of the total equity lost. That’s out of 50 losing trades! Whether I wasn’t patient enough to wait for the right setup, or I didn’t have an exit plan, some step was overlooked. That is something I CAN fix. There is nothing wrong with losing a trade, that’s just part of the game. What’s important is that I follow my trade plan and stick to it-no matter the temptation to jump into a trade without proper preparation. I can handle the other 44 losses. They wouldn’t amount to much because I followed an exit strategy in each of them.

I’ll end with one of my favorite quotes, and hopefully you can all apply it to your trading:

Let me tell you something you already know. The world ain’t all sunshine and rainbows. It’s a very mean and nasty place, and I don’t care how tough you are, it will beat you to your knees and keep you there permanently if you let it. You, me, or nobody is gonna hit as hard as life. But it ain’t about how hard you hit. It’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward; how much you can take and keep moving forward. That’s how winning is done! Now, if you know what you’re worth, then go out and get what you’re worth. But you gotta be willing to take the hits, and not pointing fingers saying you ain’t where you wanna be because of him, or her, or anybody. Cowards do that and that ain’t you. You’re better than that!” -Rocky Balboa

Happy Trading!

Jacob Johnson

Trader Support

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20 Pips Equals Your Success

Ever dream of being that one investor? The one who predicts market events before anybody else knows they’re coming, and gets away with millions of dollars fitting nicely in your pocket? Well, it might be hard to stuff that much money your pockets… but I’m sure you would have no trouble finding a nice safe place to store your millions. Wouldn’t it feel great to make it on the list of legendary traders known for their cunning and incredible returns?

1929: Jesse Livermore shorted the stock market (predicting the crash) and made $100 million.

1987: Paul Tudor Jones shorted the stock market (predicting Black Monday), making an estimated $100 million.

The 1980s (after Black Monday): Andy Krieger shorted the Kiwi (predicting it was highly overvalued) and made $300 million.

1992: George Soros shorted the British pound, making $1 billion dollars (meanwhile Stanley Druckenmiller invested in the german mark and made an additional $1 billion for Soro’s Quantum fund)

2000: John Templeton made $80 million in a week shorting the Dot-Com bubble.

2003: Andrew Hall went long (like, 5 years long) on oil and made enough to land a $100 million dollar bonus.

2007: John Paulson and Kyle Bass both made $3-4 billion shorting subprime mortgages and mortgage-backed securities.

2009: David Tepper went long on banks (predicting they would recover from the financial crisis) and made $7 billion.

Of course, while some take opportunities in the market to make millions, you have to realize the enormous risk behind these trades. As investor Spidey-man would say, ‘With great returns comes risk of great losses.’ For example: Yasuo Hamanaka lost $2.5 billion shorting copper, Brian Hunter lost $6.5 billion in natural gas futures, and Jerome Kerviel lost an incredible $7.1 billion in European futures. Just this last May, China’s richest man lost $15 billion when his company shares plummeted. Ouch – somebody didn’t have their stops on!

The difference between us and them is as simple as a couple of zero’s. Say you make 20 pips with one lot, while somebody else makes 20 pips with 100 lots. You both made 20 pips, but the one with 100 lots made a lot more money. Honestly, it all depends on how much money you put into the trade. The more you practice hitting your 20 pips a day, the more comfortable you’ll become trading in the market. The more comfortable you become in the market, the more money you’ll invest in it. The more money you invest, the more money you’ll make (as long as you’re smart about it). Then, you’ll be hitting your daily 20 pips with 100 lots and making a lot more zeros.

Happy Trading!

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Bunnies and Money Management

It is essential to understand money management before you enter the market. In fact, learning the essentials is important before you try anything. I learned this lesson years ago while caring for my neighbors animals.

babybunnyLast summer, my neighbors went on their annual camping trip to Beaver, Utah. Every year they ask me to take care of their pets while they’re away. The number of pets they have is always growing, and that year consisted of 12 chickens, 2 fish, 1 cat, and 4 bunnies. I never have, and am doubtful that I ever will, own a pet, but I agreed to help them out. I received 3 pages of typed instruction, and training on how to place the labeled chicken food into the labeled chicken pen using the labeled chicken scoop (I may have accidently mixed up the cat and chicken food the year before). I even practiced feeding the chickens with their daughter two days in advance. They left feeling reassured that not even I could mess up their detailed instructions, and I watched them go feeling confident in my ability to keep their animals alive for five days (one year the cat jumped into the fish tank, resulting in a decrease in the fish population).

The next day: I fed the fish, I fed the cat (not the fish), I fed the chickens, gathered the chicken eggs, and opened the door to the bunny cage. Unfortunately, the bunny in there ran out as soon as the door was opened, and I spent the next hour chasing it around the backyard. Finally, with the bunny safely in my arms, I returned it to the cage with the other bunnies. I replaced the food and water, and left feeling like a champ.

The next five days passed uneventfully, and I was delighted with my success. My neighbors returned, and immediately checked to see if their dear pets were still alive. I happily informed them that they were all alive and well. Their daughter, inspecting the bunnies, turned around and said, “Mom? Why is the boy bunny in with the girl bunnies?” One month later, they had 34 baby bunnies.

Truthfully, I’m uncomfortable with animals. They sound easy to take care of, and I had the instructions and means to take care of them, but I had no experience or any idea on how to actually handle them. Now, relate this to money management. I know it can feel like a stretch comparing caring for animals to your money (though I wish my money could reproduce as fast as those rabbits), but the similarity isn’t between animals and money. It’s between knowing how to handle and care for them.

Proper care and handling of money in the markets is key to successful trading.  In the same way improper handling of the neighbors farm resulted in unintended consequences, improper handling of money can have unintended effects – loss of capital, longer hold periods, lost opportunities.  However, with some basic knowledge, a good set of instructions, close attention to details and discipline you’ll discover that you can manage your results with much greater control…  And who knows, maybe your monies can grow like bunnies.

Happy Trading!

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A Constructive Review

Silas shares his story on how he got involved with Apiary fund.

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How

I started working for Apiary Fund in 2013. Before I got involved, I had never traded before; I don’t think I had even used a computer. I had been a union worker out of Local 27 for ten years. I never had enough money to even think about trading, or learn what forex was. If it wasn’t for Shawn, I know I wouldn’t be here…

 

I was injured in a construction job, which led me to find a new home, and meet an awesome man.  He introduced me to his company, the Apiary Fund. He offered me a job-something I had no experience in.

Since I started last year, I have worked my way into a funded account. Trading is something that I can do for the rest of my life. I enjoy that fact that can work from my home and spend time with my family, but no matter where I am, as long as I have a computer, I can trade.

I am very grateful for the turn of events in my life: the support I receive from my now close friend Shawn, the opportunity to come to his Apiary family, my amazing co-workers, and the many, many great people I get to meet on the phone daily.

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The Convenience of Trading From Your Own Home

“I had no idea that people could trade at the convenience of being in their own home…”

When you think stock market, do you imagine high rise buildings and the Chicago Stock Exchange? What about a giant screen with numbers flashing while men in suits yell ‘buy’ or ‘sell’? You probably don’t imagine your own bedroom, or even your La-Z-Boy recliner. Allisa shares her story on how she got involved with Apiary Fund.

“I started at the Apiary Fund almost a year ago. Until that point I had no idea that people could trade at their convenience of being in their own home. When I pictured the trading market I thought of people going Wall Street in New York. Little did I know.

I started working at Apiary in February, and since then I have gone through the process to get into a funded account. I didn’t even download the platform until April. It was around July that I started to take it seriously-placing trades on a daily basis. Soon it was the end of August, and I got into a pre-funded account! Before I knew it, I was funded by September. I was proud of myself for making a goal, and reaching it, but I was also proud because I was now the only girl in the office that was funded.

I am thankful for Apiary because it provides me with opportunities that I would have never thought I had.”

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Fourth Trade of The Week

Fourth trade of the week (Feb 2nd, 2014 – Feb 7th, 2014)

Cycle 5 setup on demo account.

GBPAUD demo trade

Price entry: 1.85832 (Feb 3rd, 2014 16.29pm dealing desk time)

S/L: 1.85462

Target: 1 Range at 1.86202

Placed order on real account

GBPAUD real trade

Price entry: 1.85785 (Feb 3rd, 2014 16.30pm dealing desk time)

S/L: 1.85462

Target: 1ATR at 1.85983 and 1 range 1.86155

Result:

 GBPAUD 1Range trade

Closed part at 1 ATR (Feb 3rd, 2014, 17.04pm) & 1 range (Feb 3rd, 2014 18.51pm dealing desk time): 11 pips & 37 pips

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Last Trade of The Week

Trade of the week (Jan 26th, 2014 – Jan 31st, 2014)

Cycle 5 setup on demo account.

USDCHF demo trade

 

Price entry: 0.89975 (Jan 30th, 2014 10.02am dealing desk time)

S/L: 0.89655

Target: 1 Range at 0.90295

 

 

Placed order on real account

USDCHF real trade

 

Price entry: 0.89968 (Jan 30th, 2014 10.04am dealing desk time)

S/L: 0.89655

Target: 1ATR at 0.90049 and 1 range 0.90288

 

 

Result:

USDCHF 1Range trade

 

Closed part at 1 ATR (Jan 30th, 2014, 12.40pm) & 1 range (Jan 30th, 2014 16.02pm dealing desk time): 8 pips & 32 pips

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Seventh Trade of The Week

Seventh trade of the week (Jan 26th, 2014 – Jan 31st, 2014)

Cycle 5 setup on demo account.

USDCAD demo trade

 

Price entry: 1.11387 (Jan 29th, 2014 11.22am dealing desk time)

S/L: 1.11707

Target: 1 Range at 1.11067

 

 

Placed trade on real account

USDCAD real trade

 

Price entry: 1.11427 (Jan 29th, 2014 11.23am dealing desk time)

S/L: 1.11707

Target: 1ATR at 1.11304 and 1 range 1.11107

 

 

Result:

USDCAD 1Range Trade

 

Closed part at 1 ATR (Jan 29th, 2014, 13.45pm) & 1 range (Jan 29th, 2014 13.49am dealing desk time): 12 pips & 32 pips

 

 

 

 

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Fourth Trade of The Week

Fourth trade of the week (Jan 26th, 2014 – Jan 31st, 2014)

Cycle 5 setup on demo account.

EURUSD demo trade

 

Price entry: 1.36740 (Jan 27th, 2014 10.43am dealing desk time)

S/L: 1.37060

Target: 1 Range at 1.36420

 

 

Placed trade on real account

EURUSD Real trade

 

Price entry: 1.36773 (Jan 27th, 2014 10.44am dealing desk time)

S/L: 1.37060

Target: 1ATR at 1.36687 and 1 range 1.36453

 

 

Result:

EURUSD trade result

 

 

 

Closed part at 1 ATR (Jan 27th, 2014, 12.04pm) & 1 range (Jan 28th, 2014 10.04am dealing desk time): 9 pips & 32 pips

 

 

 

 

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